facebook icon  twitter icon  pinterest icon instagram icon 

 enews button

digitaledit header
jpeg
recent-comments-header
  • Outdoor Living Essentials
    I like how you mix things up so everything doesn't match. I think it takes a really creative, and intuitive eye to do this. Your deck has a slightly e...
  • Transforming an Energy Eater Into an Ene...
    What a sham! I am appalled. This article and the story are dishonest. It is a complete fabrication not a misrepresentati on. What you see in the pictu...
  • The Rogue Creamery Guesthouse
    It is not a real horse head, it's made of fiberglass. Designer, DeWayne Lumpkin found this at the Alameda Point Antiques Faire and it serves as a cele...
Main Homes The revival: Moroccan fantasy

The revival: Moroccan fantasy

Print E-mail
Pin It
Monday, April 30, 2012

Page 1 of 4

<< Start < Prev Next > End >>

Julie Olson has baths in the belfry. She’s not crazy. She just enjoys soaking in a cast-iron tub in the bell tower of the circa 1892 church she calls home.

Stained glass windows, a choir loft and the raised altar area are still evident in the wood-clad Milwaukie building. A wall divides the church lengthwise, where a center aisle might have been, all the way up through the choir loft. It helps break up the 5,000 square feet into manageable rooms for Olson, her partner, Ron Irwin, and Olson’s 94-year-old mother. Olson bought the church in 1993.

“After 25 years living in Morocco, a split-level home in the suburbs wasn’t going to cut it,” says Olson with a laugh.

2012JunJul_Church_01 2012JunJul_Church_02 2012JunJul_Church_05

High ceilings, stained glass and a raised altar area in the living room reveal the home's past as a church.

Church details, including the belfry and windows, are still evident in the Milwaukie home.

Ron Irwin and Julie Olson by the people-sized openings in the camel doors.

// Photos by Jon Jensen

 

 

 
 
lesben porno delhi escort