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Main Homes Green wash

Green wash

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Written by Margaret Foley   
Monday, June 25, 2012

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Above: Shannon Latimer Marchant, owner of green cleaning company Domestica, users one of her company bikes, which were specially designed by Joe Bike, a Portland bike shop, to carry supplies.

Below: ...And The Kitchen Sink is available in spray ($7) and concentrate ($40 for 33 oz.)

GL2012 GreenWash02

 

Those cleaning products you use because they leave a clean fragrance may be leaving behind more than the smell of freshness. According to the Environmental Protection Agency, indoor air can be two to five times more polluted than outdoor air. An easy way to decrease pollutants in the home is switching to eco-friendly household cleaners. Products that contain ingredients such as ammonia, petrochemicals, formaldehyde and bleach can irritate and burn skin and eyes, and can cause respiratory problems.

“When I first began cleaning houses, I didn't use green products,” says Shannon Latimer Marchant, the owner of Domestica, one of Portland’s first green cleaning companies. “I always had a runny nose or a sore throat and felt as if I were coming down with something.” Marchant, who has also lived in Germany and France, noticed that people there didn't use nearly as many cleaning products or as many traditional ones, yet “everything was cleaner.” It inspired her to begin developing nontoxic, plant-based cleaners for her own use. “I discovered that I could create products inexpensively and use them in my business,” she says. Read the ingredient list to avoid becoming a victim of greenwashing, which is when a product is promoted as green but is not. “I think some companies try to get consumers to buy a product by having the label say what’s not in it, rather that what’s in it,” says Portland-based Cassandra Iams, who makes ... And The Kitchen Sink, an all-natural, all-purpose cleaner available in six aromatherapy blends.

“I think you need to be worried if a product won’t reveal all its ingredients, or if it includes ingredients such as dyes that are not necessary for the product to be effective,” Iams says.

As eco-friendly cleaning products have become more mainstream, specialty products designed for just one task, such as cleaning granite, make going green an expensive proposition. “You don’t need to be that specialized,” says Iams. “A good all-purpose cleaner can take care of most things. The performance of specialty products doesn't always justify the price. There’s no reason healthy living should be expensive.”

If you want to try using only green cleaners, you don’t need to make the switch all at once. “If you can reduce what you’re doing by 50 percent or so, that’s a great start,” says Marchant. “Start with a couple areas, such as the kitchen or bathrooms, and work up to the times when using something like ammonia or bleach becomes the exception to your routine.”

You can also make your own cleaners and scent them with essential oils. For example, citrus cuts grease, and baking soda is nonabrasive. White vinegar inhibits mold and bacteria, and some essential oils have antibacterial qualities.

“When you make your own cleaning products, you can mix the ingredients to create something that’s specific to the needs of your home,” says Marchant. “You’ll get more pleasure out of cleaning and create a healthier home environment.”

 
 

Comments  

 
+1 #1 RE: Green washJOY THOMAS 2012-06-28 11:06
I love "And the Kitchen Sink." Good for cleaning sinks, toilets, counters, and even greasy hands. Smells great, too.
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0 #2 Go GreenJonErik Ross 2012-06-28 14:49
"And the Kitchen sink" is hands down the best. Go green, get clean, and feel good about it.
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0 #3 Where To BuyCassandra Iams 2012-06-29 09:42
And The Kitchen Sink is available at C11products.com, or if you're in Portland, OR, at Food Front Co-op NW, Portland Homestead Supply Store and Green Dog Pet Supply.
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0 #4 And the kitchen sink. Try it and you wont go backLisa Rababy 2012-07-14 20:38
I have been using this for the past couple years. I have switched to the concentrate. Not only does it save on waste and shipping cost, but it has additional uses. Great as a spot treatment for laundry. I use the recommended mixture on my Cesarstone countertops. It also works great on my Moms soapstone counters, which dry out with all other cleaners she has tried.
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